Cape Town Food Photography and styling course

February 19, 2014 in course

 

Russel Wasserfall and Samanta Linsell Food photography and styling course

I am teaming up with the amazing and highly talented photographer Russel Wasserfall to present  our third comprehensive two day hands on workshop on Food Photography and Styling, and we invite you to join us.

About the Photography

Russel Wasserfall takes you through the steps you need to follow to become a confident and accomplished food photographer. He begins with switching on the camera and takes you through the technical and creative stepping-stones to shooting magazine-quality food photos. You will go away equipped with the skills to create a little studio at home, assess and manipulate light, stop fighting with your camera and make it do what you want. Most of all you will have the tools and understanding to constantly assess and improve your photography.

Russel Wasserfall

Rissel Wasserfall photography

About the Styling

Food photography and styling go hand in hand and I will cover the ways in which you can improve your food image through propping, food preparation and composition. I will take you through a few tips of the trade and show you a few handy tools. We will look at ways to arrange the same dish using different styles, and help you understand themes. I will address a few styling challenges, offer solutions and generally be on hand to share my knowledge as a professional food stylist in a fun and interactive way.

Russel and I will work with natural light and guide you to create beautiful food images and styled sets.

Samantha Linsell

Who should attend?

This course is for food and photography enthusiasts who want to understand what it takes to make usable and high quality food images for their blogs, as a profession, or simply as a hobby. It is strongly advisable that the attendees own a Digital SLR with interchangeable lenses or have the intention to buy one. On the course you will be able to seek advice on the best gear for the kind of photography you intend doing. Alternatively, we will show you how to get the best out of your existing equipment. We take you from switching the camera on to making beautiful food images in the course of two days.

 When?

27 & 28 March 2014 (Thursday / Friday)

 Where?

At The Restaurant at Overgaauw in Stellenbosch. 

To have a peek at what the gorgeous venue looks like – take a look here.

 Cost

R5500 per person

(This includes a lunch on both days as well as all food used in the workshops)

In order to gain the maximum benefit from the course, spaces are limited to a maximum of 10 people. This is a unique opportunity and not to be missed.

To book your place or for more details on the course, please email me on:  Slinsell (@) gmail (dot) com

You can view Russel’s professional website here and Sams site here, as well as Sam’s website - Drizzle and Dip  home to her professional photography portfolio.

To check out how it looked on our first course – click here.

What our past students said:

“Just wanted to say a quick thank you to you and Russel for being so generous in sharing your knowledge and experience the weekend of the workshop and your ongoing assistance afterwards as well.
I have searched for a number years to find a creative outlet I so desperately needed and I am having huge fun with my food photography and the styling/recipe writing etc experience around it. And without that weekend I would not have any of the confidence to even give it a good try. I am getting amazing feedback and just love doing my weekly posts.” Hein

“Thanks once again for a fantastic two days – I wish we could have continued for another 2 days as I’m sure there is still so much to learn. Your passion is so visible and so addictive – loved every second of it !  A special thanks also to Sarah for the x-tra attention and also for Camilla for the absolutely amazing amazing food ! - Kosie

A few pics from our past course:

Food photography and styling course

Russel talks about the first course:

‘Our last food photography and styling course at The Table restaurant just reminded me why I started running courses. This was the first one I did with Sam Linsell, and that was an education in itself. Sam is such a great stylist because she really lives her craft. If she isn’t actually working, she’s shopping for props, or cooking and styling and shooting for her blog. Her enthusiasm is palpable, and completely inspiring – she also taught this slightly battered photographer a few new tricks.

Speaking of new tricks, that was the reminder: I do these courses because of what I learn. I remember when Sophia Lindhop did the course – she couldn’t even switch her camera on to start with, but she completely inspired me with her eye. We discussed the Thirds Rule and she did something that completely changed my perspective on food photography. She used Thirds and the depth of field lesson we had just completed to create an image that made me reassess how I built a still life photo. Cracker. It’s so amazing that someone who literally is too afraid of the technology to hold it properly can produce a show-stopping image.

On the course with Sam, there were a few show-stoppers, many of them produced with the simplest of SLR’s. There were also great learning moments. One of the students showed me an image with an interesting effect. He wanted to know how it was achieved. Because it was a style that was trendy in food shooter circles a while back and things had moved on, it was a bit of a forgotten technique for me. Trying to explain it made me access a body of knowledge I hadn’t considered for years. (You have to do the course to find out what it was.)

It’s amazing that the technology has actually made it easier to teach the basics of photography in a very short time. It’s equally cool that short-circuiting years of learning allows people who might never have picked up a camera to express such intense creativity. It all makes me a very happy – if somewhat dented – photographer’.

Food photography and styling course

Food photography and styling course

 

Bottomless bubbly lunch at 15 On Orange

December 3, 2013 in events / parties, restaurants

On the first Sunday of every month, 15 On Orange put on their bottomless bubbly lunch and its rather spectacular. Graham Beck Méthode Cap Classique Brut and Brut rose are served continuously to your table throughout your visit from 12.30 – 3.30pm, as you nibble your way through Executive Chef Sanel Esterhuyse’s sophisticated cold starter buffet.

There are so many exquisite seafood options. Five kinds of salmon (tartare, sashimi, salmon roses, gravadlax etc), tuna done a few ways (seared, sashimi and tartare), mussels, prawns, oysters and calamari. There are lovely cold meat cuts, salads – including my favourite Caesars salad, cheeses and breads. This is all before you get to the hot buffet which features curry, fillet steak and seafood dishes.

The dessert buffet is beautiful and impressive with a wide range of small tasting plates of delicious sweet treats. Macaron’s to chocolate mouse, to cake, biscuits, creme caramel, meringues, fruit and so much more.

For a special treat or family gathering, I highly recommend this monthly lunch.

R495 pp inclusive of all the bubbly.

A bit more on the menu:

 

  • Traditional Caesar, Cajun Chicken, Grana Padana, Foccacia Croutons & Sesame Bacon
  • Seared Beef Carpaccio, Mushroom Confit, Horseradish Cream
  • Flior de Latte Mozzarella and Plum Tomato, Rocket Pesto
  • Roast vegetable roulade with goats’ cheese sundried tomato tapenade
  • Prosciutto Ham, Coppa, Smk Beef and Milano Salami with Stone Ground Mustard, Sweet Pickles and Marinated Olives
  • Vietnamese salad rolls with vermicelli noodles, crab and avocado
  • New style sashimi with yuzu dressing
  • Hazelnut crusted Beef Filet Mignon, fondant potatoes Wild mushroom Casserole
  • Chermoula lamb cutlets & ratatouille vegetables
  • A dessert counter filled with the chef’s finest collection of Gateau, French Pastries and Cakes.

15 on Orange Hotel

African Pride Hotels

For bookings:

T: +27 (21) 469 8000
reservations@15onorangehotel.com

*Disclaimer – I was invited to enjoy the lunch and there was no obligation for me to write about it. These photographs were supplied to me.

food photography & styling course

October 31, 2013 in course

 

Russel Wasserfall and Samanta Linsell Food photography and styling course

I am teaming up with the amazing and highly talented photographer Russel Wasserfall to present  our third comprehensive two day hands on workshop on Food Photography and Styling, and we invite you to join us.

About the Photography

Russel Wasserfall takes you through the steps you need to follow to become a confident and accomplished food photographer. He begins with switching on the camera and takes you through the technical and creative stepping-stones to shooting magazine-quality food photos. You will go away equipped with the skills to create a little studio at home, assess and manipulate light, stop fighting with your camera and make it do what you want. Most of all you will have the tools and understanding to constantly assess and improve your photography.

Russel Wasserfall

Rissel Wasserfall photography

About the Styling

Food photography and styling go hand in hand and I will cover the ways in which you can improve your food image through propping, food preparation and composition. I will take you through a few tips of the trade and show you a few handy tools. We will look at ways to arrange the same dish using different styles, and help you understand themes. I will address a few styling challenges, offer solutions and generally be on hand to share my knowledge as a professional food stylist in a fun and interactive way.

Russel and I will work with natural light and guide you to create beautiful food images and styled sets.

Samantha Linsell

Who should attend?

This course is for food and photography enthusiasts who want to understand what it takes to make usable and high quality food images for their blogs, as a profession, or simply as a hobby. It is strongly advisable that the attendees own a Digital SLR with interchangeable lenses or have the intention to buy one. On the course you will be able to seek advice on the best gear for the kind of photography you intend doing. Alternatively, we will show you how to get the best out of your existing equipment. We take you from switching the camera on to making beautiful food images in the course of two days.

 When?

21 & 22 November (Thursday / Friday)

 Where?

At The Restaurant at Overgaauw in Stellenbosch. 

 Cost

R5500 per person

(This includes a lunch on both days as well as all food used in the workshops)

In order to gain the maximum benefit from the course, spaces are limited to a maximum of 10 people. This is a unique opportunity and not to be missed.

To book your place or for more details on the course, please email me on:  Slinsell (@) gmail (dot) com

You can view Russel’s professional website here and Sams site here, as well as Sam’s website – Drizzle and Dip  home to her professional photography portfolio.

To check out how it looked on our first course – click here.

What our past students said:

“Just wanted to say a quick thank you to you and Russel for being so generous in sharing your knowledge and experience the weekend of the workshop and your ongoing assistance afterwards as well.
I have searched for a number years to find a creative outlet I so desperately needed and I am having huge fun with my food photography and the styling/recipe writing etc experience around it. And without that weekend I would not have any of the confidence to even give it a good try. I am getting amazing feedback and just love doing my weekly posts.” Hein

“Thanks once again for a fantastic two days – I wish we could have continued for another 2 days as I’m sure there is still so much to learn. Your passion is so visible and so addictive – loved every second of it !  A special thanks also to Sarah for the x-tra attention and also for Camilla for the absolutely amazing amazing food ! – Kosie

A few pics from our past course:

Food photography and styling course

Russel talks about the first course:

‘Our last food photography and styling course at The Table restaurant just reminded me why I started running courses. This was the first one I did with Sam Linsell, and that was an education in itself. Sam is such a great stylist because she really lives her craft. If she isn’t actually working, she’s shopping for props, or cooking and styling and shooting for her blog. Her enthusiasm is palpable, and completely inspiring – she also taught this slightly battered photographer a few new tricks.

Speaking of new tricks, that was the reminder: I do these courses because of what I learn. I remember when Sophia Lindhop did the course – she couldn’t even switch her camera on to start with, but she completely inspired me with her eye. We discussed the Thirds Rule and she did something that completely changed my perspective on food photography. She used Thirds and the depth of field lesson we had just completed to create an image that made me reassess how I built a still life photo. Cracker. It’s so amazing that someone who literally is too afraid of the technology to hold it properly can produce a show-stopping image.

On the course with Sam, there were a few show-stoppers, many of them produced with the simplest of SLR’s. There were also great learning moments. One of the students showed me an image with an interesting effect. He wanted to know how it was achieved. Because it was a style that was trendy in food shooter circles a while back and things had moved on, it was a bit of a forgotten technique for me. Trying to explain it made me access a body of knowledge I hadn’t considered for years. (You have to do the course to find out what it was.)

It’s amazing that the technology has actually made it easier to teach the basics of photography in a very short time. It’s equally cool that short-circuiting years of learning allows people who might never have picked up a camera to express such intense creativity. It all makes me a very happy – if somewhat dented – photographer’.

Food photography and styling course

Food photography and styling course

 

bill granger’s lime and coconut delicious and his new tv show

September 10, 2013 in baking, recipes

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

I got a little excited on Friday when BBC Lifestyle sent me an extra special and super exciting invitation to enter a cooking / social media / blog challenge which involved making Bill Granger’s lime and coconut delicious dessert, taking pictures of my version of it, and sending the message far and wide across my social media networks that the recipe comes from Bills brand spanking new cooking show called ‘Bills Kitchen: Notting Hill’.

When you hear what the prize up for grabs is, you will see why I dived right into my kitchen with the ingredients they sent me, and whipped up this delicious dessert.

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

Well actually before I dived in, I got to watch the episode the recipe is featured on first and was very impressed. As a person who watches an extraordinary amount of food TV this show is very much in keeping with Bill’s style of cooking and presenting on TV. He is still super relaxed and makes cooking seem effortless, but now instead of being in Sydney, he is in London. More specifically Notting Hill, where he has opened up his restaurant. I cant wait to see the rest of it.

Whenever I think of Bill’s cooking I always think of fresh and zesty recipes that have a clarity of flavour and a focus on great ingredients. In ‘Bills Kitchen: Notting Hill’ he takes this food philosophy and merges it with British inspired food, giving it a great big delicious Bill Granger twist.

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

The recipe is simply called delicious, but is in fact a delicious baked hot pudding that would be delectable on a cold Winters day or equally as appealing in the middle of Summer. The top is a light and fluffy sponge, but as you spoon down you get to a gooey custard-like bottom part.

*cooks notes ~ I used skim milk instead of whole (I always do), and reduced fat cream to pour.

Recipe | serves 6 – 8 (depending on the size of the ramekins)

  • On Drizzle and Dip

Bills Kitchen: Notting Hill

PREMIERE:

Series 1 x 10 Episodes from Tuesday 24 September

21:00 on BBC Lifestyle - DSTV channel 174

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

Bill Granger's lime and coconut delicious

I look forward to connecting with you again in the future.

Visit my Drizzle and Dip Facebook page to get updates of all my posts.

I can also be found enthusiastically pinning beautiful food images on Pinterest, and snapping pics of my life in Cape Town and what I eat on Instagram

crispy fried roasted tomato risotto balls with smoked mussels

August 21, 2013 in recipes

crispy fried roasted tomato risotto balls with smoked mussels

roasted tomato risotto

Arancini, or crispy fried risotto balls were invented by the Italians to use up any left over risotto. Taking something totally delicious and turning it into something arguably even more delicious is pretty clever, and I had never made them before. I never get to the part where there is any leftover risotto. Cheese is often included, but for my version I decided to make a roasted tomato risotto and then roll this around a smoked mussel, crumb and deep fry.

Lucky Star, the iconic canned fish brand in South Africa approached me to come up with a new and interesting  recipe using one of their products, and I could pick whichever one I liked in their range. Smoked mussels it had to be.

smoked mussels

I fell in love with smoked mussels in my late teens when my boyfriend at the time introduced them to me. We would eat them straight up on a cracker on the beach for sun-downer picnics, and he made a pasta dish I loved, and will always remember that included tomatoes, onions, garlic and smoked mussels. I wanted to create a dish that had all the flavour of his pasta but would be a creative and interesting way to use a smoked mussel.

Tomatoes, when simply roasted with olive oil, thyme, good sea salt and pepper turn into something quite magical, and in this recipe I used a combination of ordinary tomatoes and a selection of Mediterranean vine and rosa tomatoes.

roasting tomatoes

roasting tomatoes

This recipe for roasted tomato risotto is delicious so you can make just that, or, do as I did, and use almost all of it to make the arnacini. The Lucky Star mussels added a a lovely smoky rich flavour and would work really well stirred into the risotto just before it has finished cooking, and to heat through, or to make the risotto balls. Either way they take the dish to a whole new awesome level.

* cooks notes - I love my risotto very saucy, but for arancini you need it drier as this makes it easier to roll. If yours is a little damp, simply cook it a little longer and / or add  more finely grated (powder like) Parmesan cheese which will help hold it together. I also popped my risotto in the fridge after making it to cool it quickly. I made my arancini quite big, but try and make them as small as possible while still enveloping the mussel. Put the ready-rolled risotto balls in the fridge to firm up even more before frying ( I didn’t do that, but mine were not perfectly round). The breading part is messy and you will have a little waste, but I have not found a way around this. Set up a production line with the flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs. Dampen your hands between rolling to make it easier, and try and get your family to help.

When it comes to risotto, stock is very important to the overall flavour, so use the best that you can.

The making of risotto requires constant stirring and is best enjoyed with a glass of wine in your hand and a friend nearby to talk to. I absolutely adore the almost meditative process of making it, and resign myself to the 20 odd minutes being glued to the stove. I find it, along with pastry and bread making, about giving over large amounts of love to your food, and this makes me very happy.

Recipe | Risotto serves 2 | makes +- 20 arancini

On Drizzle and Dip

*disclaimer – Lucky Star paid me to develop this recipe and supplied product.

crispy fried roasted tomato risotto balls with smoked mussels

crispy fried roasted tomato risotto balls with smoked mussels

I look forward to connecting with you again in the future.

Visit my Drizzle and Dip Facebook page to get updates of all my posts.

I can also be found enthusiastically pinning beautiful food images on Pinterest, and snapping pics of my life in Cape Town and what I eat on Instagram

beetroot and orange salad with sesame coated goats cheese and honey

July 22, 2013 in recipes, restaurants

beetroot and orange salad with goats cheese and honey

This salad is a winter delight from one of my favourite Cape Town chefs – Stefan Marais. Stefan is the executive chef of Societi Bistro and The Brasserie in Tokai and has very generously shared it with me, to share with you. Crunchy, citrussy, earthy and sweet, it has so many of my favourite flavours going on – like beetroot and goats cheese. Frankly its irresistible.

Stefan often inspires me in my cooking and a particular salad of his from the summer 2011 menu caught my fancy, and drove me into the kitchen in an attempt to recreate it. Watermelon, goats cheese, cress, mint and vodka, is a luscious treat and I cant wait to make it again when things warm up.

I styled and shot this recipe at Societi Bistro and also managed to sneak in a few pics of Stefan. When shooting people I am a little out of my comfort zone, so was rather proud at these. What do you think?

Stefan Marais

Stefan says: ‘I love this salad, crisp clean winter flavours. I serve it with the cheese, warm out of the oven so that it slightly wilts the rest of the goodies’.

Recipe | serves 4 as a starter

beetroot and orange salad with sesame coated goats cheese and honey

I have written about Societi over the years, and been fortunate enough to attend many menu tastings, including on Saturday, where I sampled some of the ‘Tour Through France‘ items. This is a unique opportunity to immerse yourself in delectable regional French cuisine. 10 weeks, 10 regions paired with 10 exceptional wines.

The first region kicks off today, and its Paris, paired with the very fine Joubert-Tradauw Syrah

Menu

Gratinee de Halles R42

French Onion Soup, Gruyere Croutes

~

Pot-au-Feu R115

Braised Pork Belly, Braising vegetables, Mustard Relish

~

Paris-Brest R38

Crisp Choux pastry, Praline crème patisserie

The French Onion soup, laced with bacon was my favourite dish of the day, and I’m thinking its definitely the next one of Stefan’s that I am going to try and recreate.

You can check out all the fun that went down on Saturday on Twitter #TourThroughFrance

Societi Bistro: 50 Orange Street, Gardens. Tel 021 4242100 (Booking advised).

 

I look forward to connecting with you again in the future.

Visit my Drizzle and Dip Facebook page to get updates of all my posts.

I can also be found enthusiastically pinning beautiful food images on Pinterest.

grilled chicken kebabs with lemon, chili and mint and home-made tzatziki

July 15, 2013 in recipes, very easy - 5 ingredients or less

grilled chicken kebabs with lemon, chilli and mint and tzatzikigrilled chicken kebabs with lemon, chilli and mint and tzatzikitzatziki

These lemony chicken kebabs with chilli, mint and oregano totally hit my recent craving for Greek flavours. I decided to make tzatziki too, because its so easy, so much cheaper and better than any shop bought variety, and I get to make it exactly how I like it – low in fat, mild in garlic and heavy on the cucumber with a citrus zing and a hit of chilli.

Simply lip-smackingly delicious.

The by product of squeezing out all the liquid from the cucumber was a refreshing drink which got me immediately imagining making a  cocktail with it.  I’m thinking Hendricks gin and some spice. Watch this space.

The kebabs can be cooked on a braai / barbecue, but if you are in a hurry a gas grill or griddle pan works just as well. Ideally you want to make the marinade in advance and let them wallow in that for as long as possible to absorb the flavour.

In the past I have enjoyed making tzatziki with zucchini, it tends to be drier and tastes amazing, but I love a more traditional cucumber version too. I used a low fat yoghurt to make the tzatziki because I am trying to watch my calorie intake. Ideally a thick, full fat Greek yoghurt is the best. I like a high ratio of cucumber to yoghurt, but if you like your tzatzki creamy, simply increase the quantity of yoghurt. It needs a fair bit of salt, so keep tasting and adjusting until you are happy with it. As far as the garlic goes, I’m not a big fan of raw garlic, it is very abrasive for me,  so I only use half to one small clove. If you like it very pungent, just add more.

Recipe | makes 4 large kebabs

My all-time best way to eat chicken kebabs – or any Greek flavored meat –  is in a toasty warm pita bread, slathered with tzaziki and filled to the brim with crunchy fresh salad.

grilled chicken kebabs with lemon, chilli and mint and tzatzikigrilled chicken kebabs with lemon, chilli and mint and tzatziki

I look forward to connecting with you again in the future.

Visit my Drizzle and Dip Facebook page to get updates of all my posts.

I can also be found enthusiastically pinning beautiful food images on Pinterest.

easy basil beer bread

July 9, 2013 in baking, recipes, very easy - 5 ingredients or less

roasted beetroot and onion tart tartin with a thyme balsamic caramelroasted beetroot and onion tart tartin with a thyme balsamic caramel

I had my big oven on while making my lamb chops, cauliflower ’cous cous’ and roasted baby vegetables, so popped a tray of cut red onions in to roast too. I was keen to try out a baby beetroot and roasted red onion tart tartin which I had seen Michel Roux Jnr make on his show Food & Drink the night before.

The red onions I used were quite small so I trimmed the ends and cut them in half so they were more or less the same size. I roasted these and the baby beetroot for about 25 minutes at 180 C, until they were cooked through and starting to caramelise. You can roast onions slowly for a very long time, but I wanted to keep some texture for the tart. It is important to roast them before otherwise they will be too firm if they are baked in the tart only.

If you don’t have baby vegetables, use normal sized, but ensure you cut them into roughly the same thickness so they make a more or less even layer in the tart.

I made and shot this right at the end of the day in the last few rays of daylight, so I forgot to add a very important element, the cheese. I had a block of the most delectable goats milk Pecorino which I shaved generously over the tart. It totally made the dish. I bought this recently at the Cheese Festival and its a real winner for me because it hits my adoration for goats cheese head on (its very goaty), but has the texture and saltiness of Parmesan. The tart is fairly sweet, so this really does need a cheese of sorts. I think creme fraiche mixed with goats cheese would also be lovely. Michel didnt use balsamic or cheese in his recipe, but I felt those elements really helped offset the sweetness of this tart.

If you missed my beetroot series in 2011 - you can click the link and see how I got carried away with this marvelous bright red vegetable.

red onions roasting

Recipe | serves 4

roasted beetroot and onion tart tartin with a thyme balsamic caramel

roasted beetroot and onion tart tartin with a thyme balsamic caramel

roasted beetroot and onion tart tartin with a thyme balsamic caramel

roasted beetroot and onion tart tartin with a thyme balsamic caramel

I look forward to connecting with you again in the future.

Visit my Drizzle and Dip Facebook page to get updates of all my posts.

I can also be found enthusiastically pinning beautiful food images on Pinterest.

lemon marmalade and polenta cake {gluten free} + a fabulous wine launch

July 8, 2013 in baking, events / parties, recipes

Lemon marmalade and polenta cake

Lemon marmalade and polenta cake

This recipe comes from Chris Hoffmann of Cafe des Arts in Franschhoek and I tasted it recently at the Leopard’s Leap Culinaria wine launch. Divinely decadent and easy to make, this lemon marmalade polenta cake is a total winner and perfect to serve with tea or as an impressive dessert.

When I got the invitation to attend the launch of this range of wines – which have essentially been made to be eaten with food – I was immediately interested. I love the idea of wine made for food and beautiful food being expertly matched to the wine.

For the launch, they invited 5 top local Franschhoek chefs to create a dish to pair with each of the wines, and one of these was demonstrated by Ryan Smith from Ryans Kitchen , who made his tuna sashimi and horseradish salad with a bubbly vinaigrette. This was paired with the Culinaria Methode Cap Classique and was exquisite.

Leapards Leap Culinaria wine

The grapes for the wines have been specifically sourced from a variety of wine regions, and for the certain characteristics that the terroir of those regions imparts on the wine. It was fascinating to learn that the type of soil in Malmesbury (shale) is ultimately fabulous for a Chenin (as one example), and how the local environment – in general – has an effect on the product.

The Culinaria range of wines – which fall under the Leopard’s Leap Family Vinyeards brand – are only available to buy and taste at Leopard’s Leap. The collection comprises a Chenin Blanc Grenache Blanc blend, Pinot Noir Chardonnay blend, a Shiraz Grenache blend, Grand Vin Bordeaux-style blend, Méthode Cap Classique champagne-style sparkling wine. The range also includes a Muscat de Frontignan natural sweet wine.

Leapards Leap Culinaria wine

The cake paired beautifully with the 2012 Leopard’s Leap Culinaria Pinot Noir Chardonnay.

*If you are in anyway apprehensive about making marmalade and think its too complicated, don’t be. This is terribly easy to do, it just takes a little time for the lemon to boil. The zesty jam, and lemony sauce make this cake quite delectable.

Recipe | Serves 6 – 8

On Drizzle and Dip 

Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards is situated on the R45, Main Road, Franschhoek. Tel: +27 (0)21 876 8002

*Disclaimer: I was invited to taste the wines paired with sample dishes, and received a bottle of each of the wines in the range as a gift.

Lemon marmalade and polenta cake

I look forward to connecting with you again in the future.

Visit my Drizzle and Dip Facebook page to get updates of all my posts.

I can also be found enthusiastically pinning beautiful food images on Pinterest.

grilled lamb chops with with rosemary and garlic on lemony cauliflower ‘cous cous’ and roasted baby vegetables

July 1, 2013 in recipes

grilled lamb chops with with rosemary and garlic

_MG_7145

While deciding what to make for supper, or should I say my blog, I thought why not do lamb chops. I have never done a lamb chop recipe for Drizzle and Dip so figured it was high time.

Although I generally prefer loin chops, I found these lovely lamb rib chops.

There are so many delicious flavour directions you can go with lamb chops, like Indian or Moroccan, but I love the simplest of flavours with them too, Italian style. I decided to make a marinade with olive oil, garlic, lemon and rosemary, and  let them hang out in that for a few hours. Overnight would be optimal.

lamb chops

grilled lamb chops with with rosemary and garlic

I decided to pan fry them on my griddle pan and serve them on a bed of fluffy cauliflower ‘cous cous’, which is my new favourite thing. If you missed my post on this a while back you can check it out here. It really has to be the cleverest way to trick your body into thinking its eating a carb. I can easily eat a half a head of cauliflower in one sitting. I added a tablespoon of chopped preserved lemon which made it all the more delicious. I used my own preserved lemons – which must be about 2 years old now- and for some reason I didn’t blog about them. Big mistake. This is a preserved item I will never go with out, and making your own is so easy, it just takes time for them to mature.

I roasted a batch of beautiful baby vegetables – not because I particularly prefer them- but because they are just so damn pretty. Choosing looks over taste was a bit of a mistake here, because apart from the baby beetroot (which I used in another recipe) and the carrots, the vegetables were a little stringy and disappointing. Baby fennel is just not nearly as juicy and flavoursome as ‘adult’ fennel and has a very strong aniseed taste.

I also decided to whip up a simple harissa and creme fraiche sauce to dip the chops into.

roasted vegetables

roasted vegetables

Recipe | serves 4

Harissa creme fraiche sauce:

  • 1/2 cup creme fraiche
  • 2 – 4 t harissa paste (depending how strong you like it)
  • 1T good quality mayonnaise (preferably homemade)

Make the marinade with the above ingredients and pour this over the lamb chops in a shallow dish. Allow this to soak in for a few hours or overnight.

Roast your vegetables by placing a layer on a baking sheet or tray, drizzle over some olive oil. I like to season with sea salt and pepper and scatter over a few thyme leaves. Roast in an oven that has been pre-heated to 180 – 200C, and roast until tender and just starting to caramelise. I normally give the pan a shake around half way through, and sometimes I turn the vegetables over.

You can make the cauliflower ‘cous cous’ in advance and reheat in the microwave just before serving, or make it just before serving, it cooks fairly quickly. Follow the recipe for it here, and add in the preserved lemon, parsley and seasoning at the end.

Heat a griddle pan or get coals in a fire to the right temperature and grill the chops on both sides for a few minutes until they are done. Baste any remaining marinade over the chops towards the end of their cooking time. The time it takes to cook them will depend on the thickness of the chops. Remove from the heat and set aside. Squeeze fresh lemon juice over and season with salt and pepper.

grilled lamb chops with with rosemary and garlic

grilled lamb chops with with rosemary and garlic

grilled lamb chops with with rosemary and garlic

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